The Books of Enoch, Jubilees, and Jasher Paperback – July 7, 2013

$22.99 $20.69

The Books of Enoch, Jubilees, and Jasher Paperback – July 7, 2013

The Books of Enoch, Jubilees, and Jasher together in one volume

*ALL NEW PRINTINGS HAVE GIANT 12 POINT TYPE!* 3/19/2018

*Enoch- Is derived from the R.H. Charles translation of The Book of Enoch reprinted and published under that name in 1917 with reworked verse numbers (Usually at sentence beginnings) for a more uniform pattern and more fluent reading experience.

*Jubilees- Is derived from the R.H. Charles translation of The Book of Jubilees, or the Little Genesis reprinted and published under that name in 1917 excluding the [Anno Mundi] date stamps, for a more uniform pattern and more fluent reading experience.

*Jasher- Is derived from the texts of The Book of Jasher Published By J.H. Parry & Company 1887 the Translator of the text is unknown to the editor.

The first part of the Book of Enoch describes the fall of the Watchers, the angels who fathered the Nephilim. The remainder of the book describes Enoch’s visits to heaven in the form of travels, visions and dreams, and his revelations.

The book consists of five quite distinct major sections (see each section for details):

  • The Book of the Watchers (1 Enoch 1–36)
  • The Book of Parables of Enoch (1 Enoch 37–71) (also called the Similitudes of Enoch)
  • The Astronomical Book (1 Enoch 72–82) (also called the Book of the Heavenly Luminaries or Book of Luminaries)
  • The Book of Dream Visions (1 Enoch 83–90) (also called the Book of Dreams)
    The Epistle of Enoch (1 Enoch 91–108)

Most scholars believe that these five sections were originally independent works(with different dates of composition), themselves a product of much editorial arrangement, and were only later redacted into what we now call 1 Enoch.

Share:

Description

The Books of Enoch, Jubilees, and Jasher Paperback – July 7, 2013

The Book of Enoch is an ancient Jewish religious work, ascribed by tradition to Enoch, the great-grandfather of Noah. The older sections (mainly in the Book of the Watchers) of the text are estimated to date from about 300 BC, and the latest part (Book of Parables) probably to the first century BC.

It is not part of the biblical canon as used by Jews, apart from Beta Israel. Most Christian denominations and traditions may accept the Books of Enoch as having some historical or theological interest, but they generally regard the Books of Enoch as noncanonical or uninspired. It is regarded as canonical by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, but not by any other Christian groups.

It is wholly extant only in the Ge’ez language, with Aramaic fragments from the Dead Sea Scrolls and a few Greek and Latin fragments. For this and other reasons, the traditional Ethiopian belief is that the original language of the work was Ge’ez, whereas non-Ethiopian scholars tend to assert that it was first written in either Aramaic or Hebrew; Ephraim Isaac suggests that the Book of Enoch, like the Book of Daniel, was composed partially in Aramaic and partially in Hebrew.:6 No Hebrew version is known to have survived.

It is asserted in the book itself that its author was Enoch, before the Biblical Flood.

Some of the authors of the New Testament were familiar with some of the content of the story. A short section of 1 Enoch (1:9) is cited in the New Testament, Epistle of Jude, Jude 1:14–15, and is attributed there to “Enoch the Seventh from Adam” (1 En 60:8), although this section of 1 Enoch is a midrash on Deuteronomy 33. Several copies of the earlier sections of 1 Enoch were preserved among the Dead Sea Scrolls.